• Kenton Tsoodle

MED Week offers business resources, connections


A consortium of Oklahoma City entrepreneurial groups and leaders will host the fourth annual Minority Enterprise Development Week Oct. 10-15 to spotlight, celebrate, and strengthen businesses owned by racial minorities, women, 2SLGBTQ+ people, disabled individuals, veterans and other minority entrepreneurs.

The 2022 OKC MED Week starts with an awards ceremony on Monday, Oct. 10. Businesses will be recognized for their entrepreneurism, achievements and contributions to Oklahoma City’s business ecosystem. Four businesses leaders will receive the inaugural OKC MED Champion award honoring local ecosystem builders.

The OKC Black Chamber of Commerce is hosting Fresh Start networking breakfast on Oct. 11 from 7:30-9:30 a.m. at Spiked, a Coffee Concept. This free event offers networking time, a panel of minority entrepreneurs, and resources and efforts in the metro area that benefit small Black and locally owned businesses. The event will have a professional photographer on hand for free headshots.

1 Million Cups will meet Oct. 12 from 9-10 a.m. at Dunlap Codding on Film Row. The event is free and attendees will enjoy pastries and coffee while hearing presentations from two startup businesses: Greener Things Glampgrounds, an upscale camping and outdoor recreation area, and Big Ass Bag, an online shopping tool that allows shoppers to put items from different stores in one place. Bring your best ideas and constructive feedback for the entrepreneurs.


Participate in a business resource fair, hear a presentation from the Kansas Federal Reserve, and engage in a community discussion of the next iteration of the Henrietta B. Foster Center on Oct. 13 from 6-8:00 p.m. at the Main Campus of Metro Technology Center, 1900 Springlake Dr.

If you’re not able to attend in person, most of these events will be broadcast on Facebook LIVE at OKC Minority Enterprise and on YouTube at Minority Enterprise Development OKC.

According to economic development data, distribution of business ownership in Oklahoma City is not proportionate to the city’s racial population distribution. Black residents make up 13% of the city’s population but own only 2% of businesses, and Latinx residents make up 21% of the population and own 5% of businesses.

OKC Minority Enterprise Development Week shines a light on underrepresentation in business ownership and provides educational and networking opportunities to help minority businesses access capital, resources and opportunities to build wealth.

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